The Children's Nutrition Program of Haiti Welcomes New Leadership

Haitian Country Director and Executive Director Bolster Nutrition Program under Leadership of New Board Chair

The Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti (CNP) is excited to announce changes in key leadership positions for the organization, which empowers families and treats malnutrition in the Leogane region of Haiti. 

Dr. Anany G. Prosper, a native Haitian with more than a decade’s experience as executive director or chief of mission with health networks in developing countries, has accepted the role of Country Director in Haiti. Keith Grant, a Chattanooga, Tennessee (USA) attorney with the firm Robinson, Smith, and Wells, has accepted the chairmanship of the CNP board of directors, and Patricia Cyr Watlington, formerly the development director for CNP, has accepted the role of executive director.

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Dr. Anany, as he is known to his Haitian staff in Leogane, comes to CNP with an impressive record of building health systems in distressed areas of Haiti, managing Ebola responses in West Africa, and coordinating disaster healthcare in the aftermaths of the 2010 Haitian earthquake and Hurricane Matthew in 2016. He has earned a Doctorate of Medicine from Haiti’s State University and a Master of Public Health from Belgium’s Institute of Tropical Medicine.

Dr. Anany Prosper is the first Haitian that we’ve ever had as our country director. He best understands the Haitian response to disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes, and rising fuel prices, that they keep encountering. -Dr. Mitchell L. Mutter, CNP Founder


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Our new executive director, Patricia Cyr Watlington, is our fearless field general. As long as we have her we’ll have enough to help those who do not have enough. -Dr. Mutter

Originally from Maine, Patricia has been a resident of Chattanooga, Tennessee since 2009. Her background as a highly successful real estate business owner and manager, registered nurse, mother, and award-winning salesperson makes her uniquely suited to guide CNP’s efforts. She has traveled the world as a goodwill ambassador through the Miss America U.S.O. tour and developed a student exchange program between her daughter’s school and a sister school in Beijing, China.

“The Haitian people suffer unimaginable misery,” says Patricia, who has traveled to Haiti multiple times over the past two years. “Yet, between 1998 and 2010, the year of the 7.0 earthquake, CNP reduced acute childhood malnutrition in the mountainous areas of Leogane from 25% to 3%.  That is an amazing record to build upon.”