Hurricane Aftermath

On October 4th, Haiti was struck by the most powerful hurricane to reach its shores in 50 years.

Since that day Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti has been on the ground, working with families who are making their way forward to long-term recovery.

Homes were destroyed, agriculture devastated, and water supplies compromised, but people in the Leogane region are slowly recovering from the immediate damage from Hurricane Matthew.

Our community health workers, known as Monitrices, are working every day to make sure the children in their communities are healthy.

While outside the direct path of Hurricane Matthew, the Leogane region was hit hard by strong winds and severe flooding. In the small and remote mountain community of Baret, loss was extensive. Forty homes were destroyed, two churches fell, latrines damaged, and livestock and crops were swept away.

Besides the visible damage from the worst storm to hit the island in 50 years, there is a quiet and silent menace which is not as visible—the heartbreaking scourge of food insecurity and malnutrition. The agricultural sector has been decimated. Crops have been lost and livestock killed. Food prices have been steadily rising. As a result, we are anticipating malnutrition to increase, especially among young children, but fighting malnutrition is what we do.

We are anticipating malnutrition to increase, especially among young children… but fighting malnutrition is what we do.

Since 1998, the Children’s Nutrition Program of Haiti has been providing solutions which combat the complex issue of malnutrition. In Haiti, we are known as Kore Timoun, which means in “Support of Children.”

We are beginning to see more reports of malnutrition, but our community health workers, known as Monitrices, are working every day to make sure the children in their communities are healthy. Monitrices are local women who uphold the highest health standards, and administer resources and training to those around them, making for healthier practices and healthier families.

If a Monitrice finds a malnourished child, that child is placed in our rehabilitation program where we administer the therapeutic supplement Plumpy Nut. Meanwhile, the child’s mother is counseled on proper nutrition and how to find and prepare food economically.

The Haitian people are resilient—but food, clean water, and proper health care cannot be taken for granted.

This Thanksgiving, consider donating to our relief program as we respond to the urgent needs of families in Haiti. On behalf of the people of Baret and Leogane, Haiti, thank you for helping the children.

 

Kore TimounComment